Candle Making Supplies Home  Site Map Site Map  Dollar Icon On Sale  Customer Service Service  Candlewic Home My Account  Check Out Check Out
Candlewic Logo Current Candle Making Supply Sales

Illumine - A Candle Making Blog

Candle Making Project, News, and Articles

Filter by APML

All Natural Candle Waxes: Which is Right for You?

by Chandler 1. October 2012 17:31

So paraffin wax isn't your cup of tea. Many candlemakers are developing a growing interest in all natural candles and these days there are more choices than ever. Choosing the proper one can be a daunting task. In this post, we will highlight some of the natural waxes to help you choose what might be right for your needs.

Soy Wax

Soy wax is definitely the most popular of all the natural waxes. Some of the reasons for its popularity are the ease of use (in most instances a very low shrink wax), the competitive cost advantage over paraffin wax, and the returning interest in using domestically produced products. Soy can make for great candles with a rich creamy look and can also achieve decent retention to containers. Here's a summary of some of the best selling soy waxes:

Candlewic Soy 125

Soy 125 is made with 100% natural soybeans that are domestically grown. Soy 125 is a blend of soy and soybean oil that will hold higher fragrance loads than the Soy-120. This wax is also an excellent choice if you want a paraffin/soy blend.

 

EcoSoya® CB-Advanced Soy

EcoSoya® CB-Advanced Soy has extreme resistance to bloom (white frosting) and "wet spots." It contracts slightly to produce a uniform beautiful appearance, requires only one pour, has good scent throw with fragrances, and a creamy white appearance.

EcoSoya® CB-Advanced Soy is made from pure soybeans and carefully selected botanical oils. Candles made with CB-Advanced Soy resist frosting, have a smooth top surface and an even burn pool with consistent color retention.

Golden Wax 444 Soy Blend

Beautiful soy candles with all-natural wax! This Golden Wax 444 soy blend is composed of 98% soy wax with 2% natural additives. It mixes very well with paraffin wax at any level and has a higher melt point than the Golden Wax 464 which enables it to retain a higher FO load to give you a stronger scent throw.

While Soy has many positive attributes we do like, soy wax does not offer the maximum fragrance throw - much to the disappointment of many. If soy could deliver better fragrance throw, more candle makers would make the transition to soy wax.

While it does compromise the natural part of candles, a growing and popular trend is blending soy with paraffin to get the strengths of both products. Many call these hybrid waxes and they are worth exploring if you have not already.

 

Palm Wax

If you are looking for the complete unique look, the palm waxes are an excellent choice. With patterns of both crystallizing and feathering, each candle looks completely different. This wax is also all natural and, in most instances, has better fragrance throw than soy wax.

Palm-1 is an excellent wax that will produce a Crystallizing pattern designed for use in jars.

Palm-2 will create the same crystallizing pattern as Palm 1 but is designed for use in Pillars and votives.

Palm-3 will create a feather patter for pillars. Unfortunately will be to hard of a wax to use in containers.

Smooth Pillar Blend. If you want a basic all natural pillar this wax is the best choice. A very high-performance, all-natural smooth pillar blend of 100% soy, palm, cottonseed and other vegetable-based wax products has excellent burning properties.

 

Beeswax

This all around best natural wax has been around for centuries and is great for almost any type of candle. White and Yellow beeswax can be used in containers, pillars and tapers. The natural aroma makes this wax a winner in all of those applications. However, the price of beeswax is always the factor in why this wax is not used more often.

In addition any of these waxes can be blended together at any percentage so you can create your own truly unique and all natural candle.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Categories: Candle Making (General) | Candle Making How To's


Container Candle Wax Choices

by Chandler 28. August 2012 20:15

Containers are generally the most popular type of candles and allow the largest selection of waxes.

There are 5 distinct differences about container waxes:

Low Shrink

These waxes are generally a paraffin base with a high percentage of petrolatum to reduce the shrinkage.

Pros

  • In most candle applications (14 ounces or less), no topping off is necessary.
  • It has d ecent adhesion to the container
  • Produces a good fragrance throw

Cons

  • As a very soft wax, it can bleed fragrance during the warmer time periods
  • It cannot get vibrant colors due to the high percentage of Petrolatum

 

Container Blends

This type of wax is generally a hard wax that has a vybar, or similar additive, and will require topping off.

Pros

  • These waxes generally ha ve the best fragrance throw for containers
  • Vibrant colors can be achieved with these waxes
  • Usually are a little more durable in warmer climates

Cons

  • Will require topping off


Soy Waxes & Palm Wax

These days, there are a large selection of Soy waxes available. Without doubt, Soy wax can be the easiest of waxes to use. For a thorough breakdown of all the soy waxes, we encourage you to visit our April 2011 issue.

Pros

  • All natural
  • Easy to work with
  • Generally no topping off is required

Cons

  • They cannot deliver fragrance like a paraffin wax candle
  • They cannot get vibrant color; the wax will need much more dye


Straight Waxes

Any wax that does not have any type of additive is considered a straight wax. The best waxes to use would be anything with a melt point of 120-129. For classification purposes, a mottling wax would fall under this category.

Pros

  • The most cost effective wax to use
  • Can create many different looks to your candles by altering the additives used
  • Can maximize the fragrance delivery by cutting back and only using the necessary amount for your formula

Cons 

  • Will take time to test which formula will work for you

  • Requires extra inventory items like additives


Hybrids

One of the growing segments of the candle industry is the use of hybrid waxes, which are a blend of paraffin and Soy. By using these blends you get the advantage of fragrance delivery from the paraffin wax and have some “natural components" as well.

Pros

  • Can label candle with “Soy Blend,” "Soy enhanced," etc.
  • Can take advantage of cost effectiveness of both Soy and/or paraffin. (If pricing of one goes up, you can use a little more of the cost competitive product)
  • Offers better fragrance throw than all natural wax candles

Cons

  • While fragrance throw will be better than Soy, it will still not achieve what an all-paraffin wax candle can.

 

The key is always choosing the wax which is best for you. The best thing about candle making is that any of the waxes can be blended together at any level you desire. In addition to the ones above, other selections include beeswax, gel and Palm. If you're interested in seeing specific waxes offered by Candlewic, be sure to check out the video below:
http://www.candlewic.com/candle-making-videos/select-candle-wax.asp

Tags: , ,

Categories: Candle Making (General) | Candle Making How To's


Candle Wax Options (Part Three)

by Chandler 12. March 2010 00:13

Beeswax Candles

The other natural wax which is commonly used and has been for hundreds of year is beeswax. This product is used in all type of candles including tapers, pillar, votives and even containers. Beeswax is one of the best all around waxes on the market.

Bayberry Wax

Soy WaxThe final wax is Bayberry and is derived from the bayberry bush and can be used at 100% or blended with beeswax. Bayberry wax offers you a very rich and unique smell. Bayberry tapers are traditionally burned during New Years. Bayberry is also used at many colonial, pioneer and other historical events.

Granulated Wax

The final type of wax which is used more for crafting and easy candle making is the granulated wax. This wax is a 140 Melt point paraffin that is formed into little beads. These beads can easily be poured into containers and a wick inserted for an instant candle. This activity is great if you own a candle shop, if you teach classes or when you do shows it is an activity the kids would want to do while the parents shop your candle selection.

No matter which wax you are currently using it always helps to know what options are available if you are adding another line or looking to change things up.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Categories:


Candle Wax Options (Part Two)

by Chandler 12. March 2010 00:11

Soy Wax

The first wax we will feature is soy. Soy wax is simply hydrogenated soybean oil and the best application for this wax is in containers. When using soy wax it is important to note that there is definitely performance and appearance differences between paraffin wax and wax and soy wax.

  • First and foremost is the appearance of the candle. Soy wax in general produces candles that have a “flat” or pastel shade to the candle. This can play very well to the scents used; in the fall nothing is better than harvest colors and fragrances.
  • Soy wax will always require more dye to get to the desired color.
  • It is as close to one a pour wax as exists in the market. It will still require some topping off if poured too hot or if the container is too large.
  • Another very positive feature of the soy wax is that the pouring temperatures have less impact on the finished candle than paraffin waxes.
  • Depending on the scent load you are using, in most instances no special additives will be needed.

By now you have to be asking yourself if it is that good then why not just switch to this wax while I read this article? The main reason is that the scent throw that candle makers achieve with paraffin just cannot be at the same level when using soy wax. As these waxes get better at scent throw or fragrance companies improve the scent throw that can be achieved, the soy market will continue to grow.

Palm Wax

The other natural wax to consider would be the Palm wax. This wax is produced by hydrogenated Palm Oils. These waxes are great because of the unique textures which can be produced with these waxes. In most instances there is a crystallizing pattern which is available for both containers and freestanding candles. In addition there is a feathering pattern which is available for free standing candles.

One of the best natural waxes we offer is the CSP wax. This is an all natural blend of soy and palm wax which creates a very nice creamy finish. This wax is excellent for pillars, votives and tarts.

Tags: , , , , ,

Categories: Candle Making (General) | Candle Making Projects & Crafts


Candle Wax Options (Part One)

by Chandler 11. March 2010 23:22

Straight Wax for Candle Making


Soy Wax Straight waxes, also known as paraffin wax, do not have any additives and are what many blends start with. These are used in many other applications and in most instances the most cost-effective product. The type of candles you make will dictate the melt point of the wax you use.

For containers a melt point of 121-129 °F is ideal for this application. You can make a very good container by using any waxes with these melt points and then adding a very small (no more then 1%) of Vybar 260. To enhance the wax you can even add 5% of Micro 180 to this wax.

For votives the ideal wax melt point would be 130-142°F. You can make a nice votive by adding some Vybar 103 (no more then 1%) and maybe something like 5% Stearic Acid.

For pillars it is best to use waxes 137-150°F. If you plan on putting a great deal of fragrance adding something like vybar and Micro will make for an excellent formulation. The nice thing about using straight waxes is that you can constantly tweak your formula and find that special look. The other added advantage is that in most instances this will allow you to purchase at the most economical means.

Candle Wax Blends


If you are starting out and want to simplify your process then blends are the best way to go for your operation. Blends are a combination of the paraffin waxes and then various components such as Micro’s and Petrolatum’s are used. In most instances the manufacturer will not provide the formulation to the end user. Blends are an excellent option in that all you will need to do is add your color, fragrance and UV inhibitors.

 

Soy Wax

The short comings of blends are that in most instances they have to be developed for a wide range of applications so if you are adding a little less fragrance then the manufacturer is recommending, you may not get the exact results you desire. Another flaw with blends is that if problems develop, it can be difficult to troubleshoot without knowing what the components of the particular blend.

The next category would be the Natural Waxes and we include in this selection Soy, Palm, Beeswax and Bayberry. Without doubt Soy wax is continuing to grow in popularity.

 


About the author

Hi I'm Chandler. Thanks for visiting! Illumine is all about helpful projects, ideas, and articles related to candle and soap making and the candle and soap making business.

Background

 

 

home | candle making supplies | about us | customer service | ordering help | shipping

custom services | candle making FAQ | candle making videos | candle making links | terms | privacy

line
The Candlewic Company

Supplies the candle making industry with candle making kits, molds and accessories including candle wax, gel, and wicks.

3765 Old Easton Road
Doylestown, Pennsylvania 18901
800-368-3352 | Local: 215-230-3601
Fax: 215-230-3606

info@candlewic.com




Official Distributors of: Penreco Candle Gels
Members: IGCA, National Candle Association



Candle making supplies

candle wax
blended candle wax
international candle wax
granulated candle wax
soy wax

 

paraffin wax
beeswax
beeswax sheets
candle gel wax
natural candle wax
candle wicks

 

candle molds
candle colors
candle scents
candle making kits
candle equipment
candle wax additives

Soap making supplies

soap making product details
melt & pour bases
essential oils
natural additives
soap molds
soap dyes

 


All content copyright 1999-2014 The Candlewic Company
All Rights Reserved. Not responsible for typographical errors. Prices subject to change without notice.

Website designed and maintained by MoJo Active