September 01, 2005

Mold Me

Mold me.
As a candle maker this is the most exciting time of the year. With fall and winter, comes holidays that are most suited for candles. What better gift to give your Thanksgiving host than an Apple Pie candle and what better way to thank a co-worker who enjoys the outdoors than with a Country Cloths Line candle. Regardless of the occasion, a candle can be a warm, inviting and intimate gift to anyone.

By the time your candle is in the hands of the consumer you have made a number of decisions all with the intent of ensuring your customer is pleased with the performance of the candle and will buy more. The intent of our newsletter is to allow you to make informed decisions on these products. Over the course of the year we have covered how to select the right wax, proper wick selection, identifying color trends and fragrance trends. (See back issues)

If you are making any type of free-standing candles, this is the issue just for you. In this issue we will be focusing on choosing the right mold for your application. In today’s candle world the choices to make pillar candles are extensive.

Aluminum - This type of mold is emerging as the best option for candle manufacturers making standard size candles such as 3" x 3½", 4" x 4½" and other 2", 3" and 4" diameter candles. These molds are relatively inexpensive and produce a very nice finish on the candle as they do not have any seam lines. The only limit to aluminum molds is that only standard sizes are generally available. Custom sizes are much more difficult to do with aluminum and tooling must be built for every different size. CHANDLER NOTE: To improve your finish using this mold try pre-heating and pouring at around 180F.

Polycarbonate - These molds are a great choice when you want to make an exciting shape or design. The finish on a candle made with a polycarbonate mold is outstanding. Polycarbonate can be a great way for “starters” to observe the way wax sets up and takes on different appearances through the cooling process. Like aluminum these molds are not suited for custom sizes or shapes. We have expanded our line and continually look for exciting new sizes and shapes.

Polyurethane - This material is in the same family as silicone and is very well suited for novelty, figurine and custom candles. The most popular finished candle using these molds are the tapers. They are available in lengths of 6" all the way to 12". Kits are available for making custom molds if you have an object or shape that you want to customize.

In some instances there is “overlap” on the types of mold materials. For instance there is a 2" x 3½" in aluminum and polycarbonate molds. The mold you choose would be determined by what you like best. In this case, the advantage with aluminum is that your candles would look consistent if you already have 3" and 4" diameter molds. If you chose to use polycarbonate in this case your 3" and 4" would look different because those sizes are not available in polycarbonate molds.

There is not really a right or wrong wax but the type of candle you make will make the decision for you what will work best.

CHANDLER'S CORNER

Hi! I'm Chandler!
I can help you
learn how to make candles.

Help, my cinnamon jar candle is no longer burning with my wick!

As you may have read on my site, a wick should be tested to each color/wax/fragrance combination. Certain fragrance/color combinations can create different burning characteristics. Cinnamon, herbs and berries in many instances create different burning properties in the candle despite everything else being exactly the same. Darker colors can also change the burning properties of the candle. It is not unusual in some of the wider diameter containers to have several different wicks for color scent combinations.

With the holidays rapidly approaching don’t forget to take advantage of our “Bonus Size” your wick order when using the Customer Wick Builder.

SCENT SALES!

Just starting out and want to make scented candles? Check out our selection of closeout fragrances for under $6.00 per pound.

Or if you wish to purchase 25 pounds of fragrance at $5.00 per pound how about these fragrances: Red Current Apple, Tangerine, Ocean Breeze, Holly Berry, Bayberry, Jasmine, Apricot, Pear , Mango , Pina Colada, Vanilla-Sandalwood, Potpourri, Spice, Coconut, or Heliotrope. If are interested please call Bill Binder at 800-368-3352 X114.

NOTE: These do not represent our standard fragrances and were part of a "Buy out". They must be purchased in 25 pound sizes only. Limited quantity of each.


50% Off at Our Crafter's Site!

At Soap Expressions/Country Lane Candle Supply, you can get 50% off on your web order during the month of September. Just get your promo code here and start your holiday shopping early! There's something for every crafter on your list!

 


September 2005

Project:
One-Pour Tins

If you are starting out making candles and looking for a good “gift” or project for this holiday season a Natural candle in a tin fits both needs. These tins are easy to make and can easily be personalized. In many instances tins do not always require coloring and the natural color of the Soy was works very well especially for Aromatherapy candles.

The aluminum tin container eliminates the need to worry over “wet spots” commonly found in glass container candles, and does not require a second pour. They are simple to make, easy to decorate, and eliminates the issues of jars breaking in transit. So if you are needing a project with your group this is perfect and to really reduce your cost check out our clearance fragrances.

Ingredients

Aluminum Tins
Soy 125
Wick Assembly
Color (optional)
Fragrance
Glue Dots

Instructions

Step 1
Heat your Soy 125 to around 150 F if you are not adding any color. If you are adding color heat your wax up to around 180 F. Add your dye and let cool back down to 150 F.

Step 2
Remove the lids from your tins and arrange on the pouring table. Some people insert wicks first with a glue dot and some add the wick after they pour. Both methods work well.

Step 3
Add your fragrance and pour.

Step 4
Let cool and decorate the tin as desired. Tins get hot, so be sure to label the finished candle appropriately.

We offer several options for coloring your wax.


What's Hot!

TOP SELLING SCENTS
Vanilla Candle Scent
Gardenia Candle Scent
Cinnamon Candle Scent
Lavender Candle Scent
Banana Nut Bread
Lilac Candle Scent
Apple Pie
Baby Powder Scent
Storm Watch
French Vanilla Scent

[ view all scents ]


Fast Fact...

Did you know that Proctor and Gamble started out as a candle company in addition to a soap company? They continued to make candles up until 1920. According to the company's web site, candle sales declined with the invention of the light bulb.

View All

Related News

 

Is It Really 2006?

December 01, 2005
2005 En-Light-Eners

On behalf of the Candlewic Company we truly wish to thank all of our customers who made 2005 a truly exciting and rewarding year. It seems every year goes faster than the previous and this year was no exception. We hope you found our newsletter informative and we have much more planned for 2006. We encourage questions, suggestions and anything else you would like to see included in the En-Light-ener.

Read More
 

Special Holiday Edition

November 01, 2005
2005 En-Light-Eners

What better time than the upcoming holidays to experience the excitement of candle making. For those who make candles for a living this time of year is exciting as your product is very much in demand. If you are just learning to make candles, there is not a better gift than one that is hand-poured and can be shared with friends, relatives and co-workers.

Read More
 

Tis The Season

October 01, 2005
2005 En-Light-Eners

For many people the change of seasons is such a beautiful experience in different areas of the country. Leaves changing color, mountains becoming snow covered and the ability to open windows in the evening for sleeping all have their special effects. However, for candle makers the change of season can create havoc and the need to change procedures. As many have learned, the procedures used to make candles are as important as the raw materials used.

Read More