July 01, 2011

Create Unique and Trendy Candles to Stand Out from the Competition

In most instances when you walk into a candle shop of any type, the predominate candle appears to be the jar candles.  There are so many different types of jars on the market and so many different fragrances available that the consumer can truly find what they like.

It seems the forgotten candle is always the pillar. This does not have to be the case when all things are considered. There can be many choices when making pillars - there are more choices and styles than you may think.

 

 


The most common type of pillars on the market are your traditional round molds usually made with aluminum molds. This type of mold is easy to use and, when used properly, will last for many years in your production. They run from a 2" diameter up to around 6" diameter. The most popular sizes in the round aluminum molds are 3" x 3", 3" x 4-1/2" and 4" x 4-1/2". These molds can be used with any scent load you desire and can be poured as hot as you would like.

Like container candles the temperature you pour pillars can influence the finish of the candle. Pouring pillar candle very hot (200F to 205F) into aluminum molds can make a very nice shiny finish when using most blends. Others may like a more rustic approach and can pour the candles at a very low temperature of something like 150F. Aluminum molds also come in other shapes like square and octagon and with the square molds have a nice round corner to help with release from the mold.  

To make candles outside the ordinary, you have to look at the polycarbonate molds which Candlewic commonly calls "Designer Molds". This style of mold comes in a huge selection of styles and sizes ranging from a somewhat common round ball mold to the opening bud polycarbonate mold.

The design potential when using these molds is endless. There are so many styles and unique shapes that you can really make some fantastic types of candles. Throw in some of the pattern

waxes or layered candles and you can really make your line stand out from your competitors. When making pillar candles the focus is more on the color and shape than the fragrance. 

One of the current trends is making tarts and/or floaters in unique shapes and patterns. In the past this was most reserved for the standard scallop shape. Now there is a huge selection of shapes and patterns including heart, fish and duck to mention a few. Pour these with no wick and they make a great tart or insert a wick and you have a unique floating candle.

Even with the most basic votive candle, there are few choices to make this candle. The traditional 15 hour votive is the best selling mold and when used with a votive wick pin making votives is very simple. The octagon votive can make for a very unique look too.  

While polyurethane is not as popular as it once was it is still the best material for making tapers. Tapers can be a great addition to your line as well, especially beeswax tapers.

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CHANDLER'S CORNER

I hope everyone is having a great summer. It is always great to be able to help all of customers and from time to time when I respond, I may use terms that we are familiar with but I do forget that candle making does have it’s own terms used in the industry.  We have featured some of these in past issues of the Enlightner but as we come closer to the busy season the number of inquiries do increase with these important terms.

Scent Load - This term especially applies to candle making. In general it is the percentage of fragrance placed in the wax. Scent load can run anywhere from 1% percent up to and in some instances exceeding 10%. This translates to 1 ounce of scent to 1 pound of wax is a 5% scent load.

Burn Rate - The amount of wax that is consumed in 1 hour of burning with the specific wick. However, without some type of base the burn rate is difficult to evaluate.

Pre-Wick Assembly - Refers to a wick that is cut to a specific length, has a wax coating and metal base. These parts have made candle making in many instances much easier.

 


July 2011

Featured Project:

Taper Candles Using Polyurethane Molds

This month’s project is an easy way for making simple taper candles by using polyurethane molds. These candles are a timeless favorite over the decades and the easy to use polyurethane molds allows the candle maker to make this candle on a small scale with out the need for equipment such as dipping rings that make many tapers at one time.

Ingredients

Instructions

Step 1
Prepare your wax with color and fragrance as you normally would for any other candle. Remember that it helps to add color and additives at a slightly elevated temperature for uniform dispersion. Let the wax cool in order to add your fragrance right before achieving the pouring temperature.

Step 2
Cut a piece of wire a little larger than twice the length of your mold and bend it completely in half. Insert the folded end of the wire through the hole in the mold, and use it to pull the wick through the taper mold. Leave an extra long length of wick so when you remove one candle it pulls enough wick through the hole so it is ready to be poured again without the use of the wire next time.

Step 3
Wrap the wick around the wick bar so it holds snug and give the inside of the mold a quick light spray of mold release. Pour the wax slowly into the mold. Keep an eye on the mold and top off as necessary.

Step 4
Use the base former to achieve a fluted end that looks very professional and aids you customer in the placement of their candle in a candle holder. Be sure the taper is burnt in a suitable candleholder.

 

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