September 01, 2012

Paraffin Wax - Not Your Cup of Tea

Paraffin wax - Not Your Cup of Tea

The interest in all natural candles continues to be strong and these days there are more choices than ever. Choosing the proper one can be a daunting task. This issue we will highlight some of the natural waxes to help you choose what might be right for your needs.

Soy Wax

Soy wax is definitely the most popular of all the natural waxes. Some of the reasons for its popularity are the ease of use (in most instances a very low shrink wax), the competitive cost advantage over paraffin wax, and the returning interest in using domestically produced products. Soy can make for great candles with a rich creamy look and can also achieve decent retention to containers. Our April 2011 issue highlighted many of the soy waxes available. In this issue, we will just summarize some of the best selling soy waxes:

Candlewic Soy 125
Soy 125 is made with 100% natural soybeans that are domestically grown. Soy 125 is a blend of soy and soybean oil that will hold higher fragrance loads than the Soy-120. This wax is also an excellent choice if you want a paraffin/soy blend.

EcoSoya® CB-Advanced Soy
EcoSoya® CB-Advanced Soy has extreme resistance to bloom (white frosting) and "wet spots." It contracts slightly to produce a uniform beautiful appearance, requires only one pour, has good scent throw with fragrances, and a creamy white appearance.

EcoSoya® CB-Advanced Soy is made from pure soybeans and carefully selected botanical oils. Candles made with CB-Advanced Soy resist frosting, have a smooth top surface and an even burn pool with consistent color retention.

Golden Wax 444 Soy Blend
Beautiful soy candles with all-natural wax! This Golden Wax 444 soy blend is composed of 98% soy wax with 2% natural additives. Mixes very well with paraffin wax at any level. Has a higher melt point then the Golden Wax 464 which enables it to retain a higher FO load to give you a stronger scent throw.

While Soy has many positive attributes we do always like, soy wax does not offer the maximum fragrance throw - much to the disappointment of many point. With some "tongue in cheek", if soy could deliver better fragrance, throw more candle makers would make the transition to soy wax.

While it does compromise the natural part of candles, a growing and popular trend is blending soy with paraffin to get the strengths of both products. Many call these hybrid waxes and they are worth exploring if you have not already.

Palm Wax

If you are looking for the complete unique look, the palm waxes are an excellent choice. With patterns of both crystallizing and feathering, each candle looks completely different. This wax is also all natural and, in most instances, has better fragrance throw than soy wax.

Palm-1 is an excellent wax that will produce a Crystallizing pattern designed for use in jars.
Palm-2 will create the same crystallizing pattern as Palm 1 but is designed for use in Pillars and votives.
Palm-3 will create a feather patter for pillars. Unfortunately will be to hard of a wax to use in containers.
Smooth Pillar Blend. If you want a basic all natural pillar this wax is the best choice. A very high-performance, all-natural smooth pillar blend of 100% soy, palm, cottonseed and other vegetable-based wax products has excellent burning properties.

Beeswax

The all around best natural wax has been around for centuries and is great for almost any type of candle. White and Yellow beeswax can be used in containers, pillars and tapers. The natural aroma makes this wax a winner in all of those applications. However, the price of beeswax is always the factor in why this wax is not used more often.

In addition any of these waxes can be blended together at any percentage so you can create your own truly unique and all natural candle.


Hi! I'm Chandler!
I can help you
learn how to make candles.

CHANDLER'S CORNER

Years ago I used to make candles as a hobby and was thinking of trying to make soy wax candles. Is it hard?

Actually, if you have the basic concepts down from the past, this should come easier. The soy wax has very little shrinkage. If you are doing it on a small scale, you can carefully microwave it. The wick will be a little different and something all cotton like the RRD series or LX will work best. Be sure to check out this video that can kind of put pictures to words best.

FAST FACT
Did you know there is actually a "Color of the Year" awarded by Pantone and for 2012 the winning color was Tangerine Tango and in 2011 it was Honeysuckle. The Pantone Color Matching System is largely a standardized color reproduction system. By standardizing the colors, different manufacturers in different locations can all refer to the Pantone system to make sure colors match without direct contact with one another.
Source Wikipedia

 


September 2012

Featured Project:
One-Pour Tins

If you are starting out making candles and looking for a good "gift" or project for this holiday season, a Natural candle in a tin fits both needs. These tins are easy to make and can easily be personalized. In many instances tins do not always require coloring, and the natural color of the Soy works very well, especially for Aromatherapy candles.

The aluminum tin container eliminates the need to worry over "wet spots" commonly found in glass container candles and does not require a second pour. They are simple to make, easy to decorate and eliminates the issues of jars breaking in transit. So, if you are in need of a project with your group, this is perfect. And to really reduce your cost check out our clearance fragrances.

Ingredients

Instructions

Step 1
Heat your Soy 125 to around 150 F if you are not adding any color. If you are adding color, heat your wax up to around 180 F. Add your dye and scent and let cool back down to 150 F.
We offer several options for coloring your wax.

Step 2
Remove the lids from your tins and arrange on the pouring table. Some people insert wicks first with a glue dot and some add the wick after they pour. Both methods work well.

Step 3
Add your fragrance and pour.

Step 4
Let cool and decorate the tin as desired. Tins get hot, so be sure to label the finished candle appropriately.

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