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Container Candle Wax Choices

by Chandler 28. August 2012 20:15

Containers are generally the most popular type of candles and allow the largest selection of waxes.

There are 5 distinct differences about container waxes:

Low Shrink

These waxes are generally a paraffin base with a high percentage of petrolatum to reduce the shrinkage.

Pros

  • In most candle applications (14 ounces or less), no topping off is necessary.
  • It has d ecent adhesion to the container
  • Produces a good fragrance throw

Cons

  • As a very soft wax, it can bleed fragrance during the warmer time periods
  • It cannot get vibrant colors due to the high percentage of Petrolatum

 

Container Blends

This type of wax is generally a hard wax that has a vybar, or similar additive, and will require topping off.

Pros

  • These waxes generally ha ve the best fragrance throw for containers
  • Vibrant colors can be achieved with these waxes
  • Usually are a little more durable in warmer climates

Cons

  • Will require topping off


Soy Waxes & Palm Wax

These days, there are a large selection of Soy waxes available. Without doubt, Soy wax can be the easiest of waxes to use. For a thorough breakdown of all the soy waxes, we encourage you to visit our April 2011 issue.

Pros

  • All natural
  • Easy to work with
  • Generally no topping off is required

Cons

  • They cannot deliver fragrance like a paraffin wax candle
  • They cannot get vibrant color; the wax will need much more dye


Straight Waxes

Any wax that does not have any type of additive is considered a straight wax. The best waxes to use would be anything with a melt point of 120-129. For classification purposes, a mottling wax would fall under this category.

Pros

  • The most cost effective wax to use
  • Can create many different looks to your candles by altering the additives used
  • Can maximize the fragrance delivery by cutting back and only using the necessary amount for your formula

Cons 

  • Will take time to test which formula will work for you

  • Requires extra inventory items like additives


Hybrids

One of the growing segments of the candle industry is the use of hybrid waxes, which are a blend of paraffin and Soy. By using these blends you get the advantage of fragrance delivery from the paraffin wax and have some “natural components" as well.

Pros

  • Can label candle with “Soy Blend,” "Soy enhanced," etc.
  • Can take advantage of cost effectiveness of both Soy and/or paraffin. (If pricing of one goes up, you can use a little more of the cost competitive product)
  • Offers better fragrance throw than all natural wax candles

Cons

  • While fragrance throw will be better than Soy, it will still not achieve what an all-paraffin wax candle can.

 

The key is always choosing the wax which is best for you. The best thing about candle making is that any of the waxes can be blended together at any level you desire. In addition to the ones above, other selections include beeswax, gel and Palm. If you're interested in seeing specific waxes offered by Candlewic, be sure to check out the video below:
http://www.candlewic.com/candle-making-videos/select-candle-wax.asp

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Categories: Candle Making (General) | Candle Making How To's


All About Aluminum: The Power of Pillars

by Chandler 17. August 2012 20:02

Jar candles have become so popular in recent years that many candle makers have forgotten the power of pillars. Pillar candles can add a real touch of beauty to any home decor, as they can offer extremely vibrant colors. Due to the fact that there is no glass blocking, the true color of the candle can be seen with the naked eye. Aluminum molds are best to create these freestanding candles and are a great investment because aluminum does not rust, so you can enjoy your molds for many years and reduce your expenses!



Selecting your mold can be fun. Candlewic offers many shapes and sizes, depending on the pillar that would best complement your existing line of candles. There are round molds, octagon molds, square molds, plus many other unique shapes in our designer series of polycarbonate molds.

There are two wicking techniques that are most commonly employed when using aluminum molds. You can use the traditional method or the pillar pin method. Both techniques work well depending on the volume of candles produced or the amount of labor available.

The traditional method involves the mold, raw wicking on a spool, a wick bar and a rubber plug. This method is best for lower volume production or in the instance when you want to leave a little length of wick on the candle to attach a bead or a tag. You simply thread the wick through the mold and place a rubber plug into the small hole to hold the wick in place. Place a wick bar across the large opening of the mold, wrap the wick around the bar and pour the wax. After the wax has cooled, the finished product will have the wick nicely centered down the middle of the candle.

The pillar pin method involves a round mold, a pillar pin and a pre-wick assembly. This method is better suited for the small to large production run. Basically, you are making a candle with no wick and inserting a wick after it cools. There are two ways to use the pin. You can either stick the disc part of the pin down into the mold or stick the pin up through the mold from the outside bottom. Pour the wax and let it cool. When you are done, you will have a candle with a hole through the center core and no wick. Take a wick assembly, insert it up through the hole and you are done. The wick will be perfectly centered. The pillar pins are only suited for the round aluminum molds.

When using aluminum molds, here are a few tips and techniques that will help you no matter what your method:

  1. Take good care of your molds. Do not use them for any other use, such as a penholder or thermometer holder, because you may scratch the inside, which will be apparent on the finished candle.
  2. By heating or cooling the mold you can achieve different aesthetic qualities to the finished mold. Cold molds give a primitive appearance, while warm molds may give a good gloss.
  3. Keep molds level, unless a desired layered appearance is trying to be obtained. By resting the mold on various angles, some neat stripes can be achieved.
  4. Take careful note on the pour temperatures. By adjusting the temperature you can control the shrinkage. Pouring too hot produces more shrinkage and may involve more topping off, while pouring too cool may not give you enough shrinkage, therefore making it difficult to remove the mold.

 

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Categories: Candle Making (General) | Candle Making How To's | Candle Making Projects & Crafts


An Introduction to Making Palm Wax Candles

by Chandler 17. August 2012 19:47

These days, a great deal of focus for natural candles is put on Soy wax, but there are other options for making great natural wax candles. If you want to create a candle with a unique pattern, where no 2 candles look the same, we would recommend trying Palm wax.

While this is an introduction to Palm, think of all the other projects you can do: layered unique shapes, different aromatherapy scents, the possibilities are endless! In today's market we feel it is important to really explore all opportunities available.

Ingredients you'll need:

 

Instructions

STEP 1

Melt Palm Wax in a pot. Note: the hotter you make the wax, the more the wax will create a snowflake look on the candle. Do not exceed 300°F (150°C).

STEP 2

Add some shavings of color blocks and 4% to 5% of fragrance.

STEP 3

Using the rubber plug and wick bar, prepare your aluminum mold for pouring.

STEP 4

Before pouring wax, it is suggested to heat the mold with a heat gun or a heat lamp to maximize the crystalizing effect of the Palm Wax.

STEP 5

Pour liquid Palm Wax into the mold and let cool. By slowing the cooling rate of your poured candles, you can create fantastic crystal effects in your Palm Wax candles.

STEP 6

Sometimes Palm Wax requires a second pour. You will know it is necessary if a thin layer of wax forms over your candle when cooled. Simply poke a hole in this layer and perform your second pour.

 

All natural and completely unique, palm wax candles are sure to capture attention and add an eclectic feel to any atmosphere!

 

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Categories: Candle Making (General) | Candle Making How To's | Candle Making Projects & Crafts


About the author

Hi I'm Chandler. Thanks for visiting! Illumine is all about helpful projects, ideas, and articles related to candle and soap making and the candle and soap making business.

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The Candlewic Company

Supplies the candle making industry with candle making kits, molds and accessories including candle wax, gel, and wicks.

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