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April 24, 2018

Evolution of Fragrances

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The 'En-Light-ener' Candle Making Newsletter
April 2018
Among the most exciting things in the candle market are the evolution of fragrances and the new and exciting launches that occur seasonally. Candle buyers are no longer satisfied with just the main staples like Vanilla, Lavender and Pine. They want to be excited by and challenged with new, bold combinations that inspire and arouse the senses.

Combinations that could have never been predicted before this transition are now best sellers. A fragrance like Bamboo Musk comes to mind. With its refined selection, this fragrance contains a harmony of hesperidic notes, including bergamot and lemon, delicately balanced with a base of ylang and soft musk notes.

Many factors influence these launches and the development of new fragrances. You may recall in our March issue last year that we highlighted how the Pantone "Color of the Year," Greenery, influenced the launch of the Spring 2017 Collection. The fragrances Cucumber Mint Spritzer and Avocado and Olive were specifically formulated and developed to match the Pantone Color of the year.
 
Cucumber Mint Spritzer Fragrance Oil
Cucumber Mint Spritzer Fragrance Oil
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Avocado and Olive Fragrance Oil
Avocado and Olive Fragrance Oil
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In 2016 and before, consumers sought out and embraced new and exciting fragrances available in the environment. Fragrances like Oak Moss – with a fresh and earthy scent and blend of Spanish oak moss, rich patchouli and Siberian fir balsam wrapped in a sheer veil of whiter amber and cashmere musk – became popular. Another one that comes to mind would be Teakwood, which is known for its sweet, woody aroma. Earthy and natural ingredients can be found in many of the newer launches.

The question is: "How do fragrance companies and perfumers arrive at these trends and develop such widely accepted fragrance combinations?"

A challenge for any perfumer who is developing and introducing these fragrances is the time involved in considering the many potential options. There are nearly 1,400 ingredients at their disposal. However, they are faced with constraints, such as volatility, stability and compatibility – not only with regard to other ingredients but also with respect to the bases these ingredients may be going into – such as paraffin wax, soy wax or even gel.

Another consideration when producing fragrances for candles is cost. While perfumes can demand some of the most expensive ingredients in the world, in most cases, this is not the same when developing fragrances for candles. Perfumers creating candle fragrances must choose ingredients that do take cost into consideration, and they may use synthetic materials, that can closely approximate the original materials.

It's astounding the cost some fragrance manufacturers will incur and the lengths some will go to obtain some of the rarer ingredients. According to Liveabout.com, one that stands out would have to be oud, which comes from the wood of a wild tropical tree called the agar. However, it is more than that. The wood has to become infected with a type of mold called "Phialophora parasitica," which causes the wood to produce the oud, a dark, extremely fragrant resin. According to this site, the essential oil produced can run more than $5,000 a pound. With a cost in that range, suffice it to say these ingredients in the essential oil form will not be found in a candle fragrance.

Once the fragrance companies consider these factors, they then classify potential fragrances in olfactive families. These classifications then assist the manufacturer in narrowing down the type of fragrance to consider.

Below is a list of these olfactive families, along with the principal note summary of each of the classifications.
CITRUS:
vitality
boost
energy
active
 
  GREEN:
nature
outdoor
cooling
fresh
  MARINE/WATERY:
watery
fresh air
crisp
ALDEHYDIC:
clean
fresh
outdoorsy
  ORIENTAL:
sensual
warming
seasonal
  CHYPRE/WOODY:
warm
sensual
complex
masculine-feminine
 
FLORAL:
feminine
familiar
pretty
clean
  FRUITY:
natural
uplifting
refreshing
escape
 
  AROMATIC HERBAL FOUGERE:
functional
fresh
classic
masculine
GOURMAND:
creamy
nourishing
comforting
  SPICY:
luxurious
sophisticated
rich
  MUSK:
clean skin
clean sheets
soft
sensual
Some of these families are easily distinguishable such as Citrus. Citrus would have principal notes such as lemon, lime or grapefruit. The Aromatic Herbal Fougere classification would have lavenders, basil and spearmints as principal notes, and Fruity would be obvious, with scents such as apple, cherry and blackberry.

There are other families that don't have easily recognizable factors – families like Aldehydic, which has Aldehyde C-12 and Aldehyde C-10, substances that are probably only known to "experts."
 
NEW SPRING/SUMMER FRAGRANCES
In the new spring/summer launch, you will find we have some exciting, bold and unique combinations.
FLORAL FAMILY
In the Floral Family, these fragrances are simple and accessible with a focus on lush, green and soft aromas with endless garden opportunities.
Sunflowers & Sunshine Fragrance Oil
Sunflowers and Sunshine Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Lemon, Agrestic, Osmanthus
M: Cyclamen, Marine, Linden Blossom, Green Leaves
B: Musk, Amber, Sandalwood
ALTERNATE NAMES: Linden & Lotus, Sea Salt Sunflower, Dew Drops & Daises
BUY NOW!
Pure Petals
Fragrance Oil
Pure Petals Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Green, Fruity, Italian Bergamot, Clementine
M: Jasmine, Cardamom, Ginger Root, Peach
B: Musk, Amber, Sandalwood
ALTERNATE NAMES: Jasmine Petals, Spiced Blooms, Peachy Petals
BUY NOW!
Dewy Dahlias Fragrance Oil
Dewy Dahlias Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Green, Citrus, Fresh, Marine
M: Rose, Apple Blossom, Jasmine, Muguet, Dahlia Accord
B: Woody, Amber, Musk, Vanilla
ALTERNATE NAMES: Magnolia Muguet, Water Lily & Lotus, Jasmine Rose
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Dancing Daisies Fragrance Oil
Dancing Daisies Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Green, Fresh Citrus, Bamboo Leaf
M: Freesia, Lily of the Valley, Muguet
B: Musk, Cedarwood, Vetiver
ALTERNATE NAMES: Bamboo Blossom, Daisies & Dew Drops, Fresh Freesia
BUY NOW!
 
BEYOND NATURAL
The Beyond Natural family offers fragrances that will allow you to detox, escape and recharge. With growing urbanization and a rising environmental awareness comes a strong need to go back to our roots and think natural. These olfactive spaces are green, earthy, purifying and lively.
Rosemary Currant Fragrance Oil
Rosemary Currant Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Orange, Eucalyptus, Rosemary, Green
M: Currant, Rose, White Floral, Berry, Peach
B: Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Vanilla, Vetiver
ALTERNATE NAMES: Eucalyptus Currant, Black Currant & Herbs, Berries & Herbs
ESSENTIAL OIL CONTENT: Celery Seed Oil, Eucalyptus Oil, Orange Oil & Rosemary Oil
BUY NOW!
Parsley Lime
Fragrance Oil
Parsley Lime Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Lemon, Parsley, Lime, Coriander
M: Birch Leaves, Green, Tomato, Cassis Buds
B: Sandalwood, Musk, Amber
ALTERNATE NAMES: Coriander Citrus, Cassis Coriander, Lime Leaves & Lemon
ESSENTIAL OIL CONTENT: Lime Oil, Lemon Oil, Coriander Seeds Oil, Parsley Oil
BUY NOW!
Mint Leaf & Lavender Fragrance Oil
Mint Leaf & Lavender Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Lavender, Mint, Saffron, Marine
M: Floral, Apple, Violet, Coconut
B: Amber, Tonka, Musk
ALTERNATE NAMES: Marine Mint, Lavender & Herbs, Aromatic Seas, Mint leaf & Lavender
ESSENTIAL OIL CONTENT: Spearmint Oil, Nanah Morocco Orpur, Lavandin Grosso Oil Orpur, Eucalyptus Oil
BUY NOW!
White Grapefruit & Tumeric Fragrance Oil
White Grapefruit and Tumeric Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: White Grapefruit, Cassis Buds, Mint Leaves
M: Turmeric, Apricot
B: Musk, Sandalwood, Lactonic, Amber
ALTERNATE NAMES: Tangerine Turmeric, Pomelo Mint, Pomelo & Peach
ESSENTIAL OIL CONTENT: Grapefruit Oil
BUY NOW!
 
MARINE WATER
From the Marine Water family, we offer fragrances motivated by the sea and that bring passion to life's journey through inspired botanical sensory creations. Marine-driven ingredients are some of the most nutrient-rich substances found in nature, and they also give off an aroma that evokes the deepest seas.
Marine Minerals Fragrance Oil
Marine Minerals Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Marine, Seaweed, Aldehydic, Ozonic
M: Peppermint, Eucalyptus, Floral
B: Coconut, Amber, Olibanum
ALTERNATE NAMES: Marine Mint, Wind & Tides, Marine Mist
BUY NOW!
Coastal Kale Fragrance Oil
Coastal Kale Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Lemon, Ozonic, Marine, Green
M: Lily, Jasmine, Aldehydic, Apple
B: Sandalwood, Cedarwood, Musk, Amber
ALTERNATE NAMES: Sea Salt Sage, Sea Kale, Mystic Minerals
BUY NOW!
Coconut Coral Fragrance Oil
Coconut Coral Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Ozone, Floral, Coconut
M: Cedar, Sandalwood, Amber
B: Benzoin, Oriental, Cedarwood, Musk
ALTERNATE NAMES: Coastal Coral, The Coral of the Story, Coral Seas
BUY NOW!
Sea Salt Surf Fragrance Oil
Sea Sale Surf Fragrance Oil
FRAGRANCE NOTES:
T: Eucalyptus, Lavender, Peach, Marine, Pine
M: Water Florals, Hyacinth, Lily
B: Musk, Moss, Cedarwood
ALTERNATE NAMES: Wind & Tides, Sea Spray, Mystic Marine
BUY NOW!
 
VIEW ALL CANDLE & SOAP FRAGRANCES
CHANDLER'S CORNER Hi. I'm Chandler.
Since we have really dived into the topic of scents, I thought it would be appropriate to revive one of the most frequently asked questions we receive every year:
How much fragrance should I add to my candles?
Although it may seem that a standard response, such as 5-7%, is the easiest way to answer, in many instances, there are other variables to consider. For example, fragrances like Cinnamon have a tendency to be very strong, and you may actually get away with adding just 4-5%. On the other hand, a citrus fragrance sometimes may need more than the standard 5-7% response. Sometimes, when people are making pillars, they prefer the fragrance not be as concentrated, because there is not really a way to "seal" the fragrance. The consumer may not want that particular fragrance overtaking the room. A container candle, on the other hand, generally can be closed and opened to help control the intensity of the fragrance.

The other important thing to remember when it comes to adding fragrance is trying not to batch by candle size but, rather, in set amounts. For example, by mixing in 1, 2 or 4 lb. quantities, you're measuring is much easier, and, if you spill any wax, you have extra.
View All

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